2 January 2015

Dropped kerbs - Barnet Council policy


Hopefully that clears up dropped kerbs for you? Seems clear as mud to Mr Mustard so he suggests the following:

Outside a CPZ - only park across your own dropped kerb or that of a friend or family member with permission.

Inside a CPZ - only park across your own dropped kerb or that of a friend or family member with permission when the CPZ is not in operation.

Near a junction is likely to be for pedestrians to cross, there might be dimpled paving, so avoid those like the plague; you will get no sympathy from a PATAS adjudicator.

Sometimes traffic wardens "forget" that they are not meant to ticket for dropped kerbs outside of CPZs (and outside of CPZ hours inside CPZs) and issue a PCN. You could print out a pdf of this blog post to give to the council as justification for cancelling their own PCN issued outside of their own policy.

Yours frugally

Mr Mustard

3 comments:

  1. We live opposite a primary school outside a CPZ. We have an unshared dropped kerb to access our driveway.
    Number of phone-calls to NSL in the past two years asking for enforcement when our drive is obstructed is between 150 and 200.
    Number of PCNs issued by NSL after those 150-200 phone-calls, zero.
    Number of times I have been late because my car is obstructed, dozens. Number of times drivers have refused to move so I can go about my business, several.
    Number of times I have been physically threatened, once.
    Following several requests from me, number of times Barnet Council/NSL have agreed to act proactively and to occasionally send an enforcement officer down at times when it's extremely likely my drive will be obstructed, zero.

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  2. So what is the legal meaning of the white H marking which exceed the width of the dropped kerbs? It sometimes painted across the width of the house, leaving quite a large area outside of the dropped kerbs. Is parking within the H marking, but not obstructing dropped kerbs can be subject to PCN?

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  3. The white line has no legal meaning - it is simply a hint to get you to look where you park. It would be inconsiderate to park over it but not illegal if you do not transgress the actual dropped kerb.

    ReplyDelete

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